DBMI Special Seminar Series: Toward Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Informatics, Health Care, and Society

The Columbia Department of Biomedical Informatics announced a series of talks entitled “DBMI Special Seminar Series: Toward Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Informatics, Health Care, and Society.

These talks, which began during the 2021 spring semester and are open to the public, focus on informatics research topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion and be part of the weekly DBMI Seminar, a 1-credit course for DBMI students who can benefit from hearing new methods of research from speakers from both academia and industry. 

Seminars that are part of this series will be posted below, while upcoming seminars will be listed on the DBMI Seminar page.

Title: Identifying and Leveraging Public Data Sources with Social Determinants of Health Information for Population Health Informatics Research 

Speaker: Irene Dankwa-Mullan MD MPH, Chief Health Equity Officer, IBM Watson Health, IBM Corporation

Abstract: Social determinants of health (SDOH) account for many health inequities. Data sources traditionally used in informatics research often lack SDOH, and, when available, SDOH may be difficult to leverage given it’s lack of specificity and lack of structured information. In this presentation, I will share the initial phases of work that we are doing around leveraging SDoH data – for health equity research – addressing some of the informatics challenges leveraging social determinants of health data to inform population health or inform health services research. I will discuss a case study using a machine learning clustering algorithm to uncover region-specific sociodemographic features and disease-risk prevalence correlated with COVID-19 mortality during the early accelerated phase of community spread.

Title: Toward health justice in informatics: a community-based, intersectional approach to HIV informatics intervention development 
 
Speaker: Megan Threats, PhD, MSLIS, Assistant Professor of Library and Information Sciences 
 
Abstract: June 2021 will mark 40 years since the first cases of what would later become known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were reported in the United States. Despite groundbreaking biomedical advancements in HIV prevention and treatment, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to disproportionately affect sexual and gender minority communities of color. In this talk, I will discuss the development of an HIV informatics intervention aimed at reducing inequities in linkage and retention in HIV prevention and care among sexual minority Black men in the South. I will present strategies for leveraging informatics to achieve health justice in the fight to end AIDS.